A Free Preview to Mark the 125th Anniversary

On August 4th,  1892, Lizzie Borden’s father Andrew and step-mother Abby were brutally murdered in their home in Fall River, MA. Lizzie, who was at home at the time of the murders,  was accused of killing her father and step-mother.  Her trial for murder was a media sensation around the world.  The all male jury acquitted her, leaving the homicides unsolved to this day. August 4th, 2017 marks 125 years since the brutal crimes occurred. We at Nine Muses respectfully mark this anniversary of the deaths of Andrew and Abby Borden,  whose lives were cut short on that hot August morning in 1892.

The late author Richard Behrens, who wrote The Lizzie Borden Girl Detective Mystery Series as well as non-fiction journal articles about Fall River and Lizzie Borden related topics, sadly will miss the August 4th Borden-related activities in Fall River for the first time in many years. It was his plan to participate on a panel of Lizzie Borden writers and to hold a book reading of his latest book. Because of his illness and subsequent tragic death, his book The Audible Amnesiac and other Lizzie Borden Girl Detective Mysteries has been delayed, but we at Nine Muses plan to publish it before the end of the year, in keeping with Richard’s wishes. Please check back for future updates.

To mark the 125th anniversary, and in memory of Richard, we are printing the second chapter of his last completed Lizzie Borden Girl Detective mystery, “The Audible Amnesiac.” We hope you enjoy it!

The Audible Amnesiac
Chapter Two:  A Mind Removed

To Lizzie’s surprise, Homer Thesinger was asleep on the couch, snoring sonorously, his bowler hat slumped over his brow.  The young inventor who had joined Lizzie in many adventures looked weak and thin, his hands rubbed black with charcoal dust.  Traces of the dust wove patterns on his lower sleeves.  She could take in at a glance that he had been awake all night, judging largely from his exhaustion and from the deplorable condition of his wrinkled and creased clothing.  She also deduced that he had been working on his iron-ore extraction project, simply because the stains on his hands could not have been caused by anything other than grinding charcoal to roast with iron pyrite to extract gold dust. In fact, it was plausible that he was employing arsenopyrite, a rock that gave off dangerous vapors when heated with coal.  The poor boy was poisoning himself, which accounted for his inability to stay awake.  As he snored, he would wheeze and twitch his nose, then rub it with his stained fingers before slumbering again.

But none of that was important for the present.  Seated next to Homer on the couch was another man, thin and nervous, with a pointed face, a triangular chin, and a peaked brow that sported two bushy eyebrows that crawled towards each other with almost pained reluctance.  Balanced on his nose was a pair of pince-nez spectacles while a trembling moustache almost obscured his small mouth.  The man was swathed in a tweed jacket that had all the signs of domestic neglect as it was missing buttons on the sleeve, had threads frayed at the edges of the pockets and lapels, but which also whispered of an unusually penurious nature.  He had not yet removed his gloves; one hand rested on a walking stick made from stained cherry wood with a polished ivory handle, and his congress boots looked as if he had just purchased them from a men’s dressing shop.  Other than the fact that he was a Freemason, had recently walked a dog that was covered in light brown fur, and was currently enduring a competition between his wife and his housemaid to keep up his appearance, Lizzie could tell nothing else about him.

The man’s eyes twinkled when he first saw Lizzie, but then his face slackened into indolence as if his expectations, brightened by her entry, were now diminishing.  “Hopeless,” he muttered in a wheezy voice.  “It will never work.”

“What will never work, Mr.—“. Lizzie waited for him to complete her sentence.

“That is the problem,” he said.  “I do not know my name.  When you entered, I thought I knew you.  But I think that of everyone I meet nowadays.  Everything is so familiar and yet, I cannot recognize anything.”

His voice, despite its thinness, stirred Homer into awareness.  The boy inventor shook his checks, grabbed at his tousled hair, and swallowed as if to remove a bitter taste from his mouth, no doubt some residue from his late night experiments.  “Who?” he said as if his mind was starting to open its lids.  “What?” he continued.

“Exactly,” his companion lamented. “Not only am I plagued by the ‘who’?  But also the ‘what’?  What am I?  I would foreswear the ‘who?’ if I could just ascertain the ‘what’?”

“Oh,” Homer said, realizing where he was.  “Yes…Lizzie…allow me to introduce my new friend.”

“What is his name?” Lizzie asked amusedly.  “Surely you must—“

“I call him Policeman Lot for lack of a better term, because when I first met him he was babbling those words.”

“Were you?” Lizzie asked, taking a seat just opposite their couch.

“I don’t remember,” the man said, rubbing his chin.  “Does that mean I’m a law officer?  I hardly know.  I can’t remember.”

“When did you first meet him?” Lizzie asked Homer.  “For if I am not mistaken, you have been spending all night in your barn laboratory working on your ore extractor, and this man you call Policeman Lot has been up since dawn getting shaved in a tonsorial parlor and buying a new pair of congress boots.  Unless you have accompanied him on his shopping excursion, I would estimate that you met him almost two hours past.”

Homer smiled wryly and tapped open his pocket watch.  He nodded then muttered, “How did you know about the ore project?  Oh, yes, the stains.  And I suppose he has particular dust on his shoes that tell you he has been on North Main Street.”

“On the contrary,” she snipped.  “It is the lack of dust on his shoes that tell me the story.  That plus the advertisement in yesterday’s Herald that there will be a shoe sale at Tyler’s this very morning, doors opening at eight o’clock.  Added to that is the left-handed style of his chin shave that could only have been produced by the barber on Columbia Street, which also gives me a good judge of the distances that he covered.”

Lot tapped Homer’s forearm and admitted, “You are right, she is uncanny.  I couldn’t even have told you that.”

Homer smiled at Lizzie.  “He seems to lose his memory every half hour.  Soon you’ll have to introduce yourself all over again.”

“How singular,” Lizzie said, staring at him with renewed interest.

“Yes,” Mr. Lot said glumly.  “My earliest memory is being in this room meeting Mr. Thesinger and hearing him describe your unique talents.  I am delighted that such a remarkable mind will be dedicated to solving the problem of my identity.”

“I have heard of such a condition,” Lizzie said, tapping her temple.  “There have been reports from Europe and a famous case in Philadelphia from earlier in the century.  I consider this to be the ultimate challenge, and a mystery refreshingly devoid of any criminal activity.”

“That we can’t say,” Mr. Lot shifted uncomfortably on the couch.  “I am also filled with a tremendous dread, an anxiety of drastic urgency.  My instincts tell me that I am in danger, that someone I am hiding from will find me and damage me.  I cannot see the face of the person pursuing me, but I can see a shadow coming up a staircase.  I am filled with the most awful feeling, that my most intimate secrets will be exposed and I will be destroyed.”

“Are these the only impressions that survive your recurring amnesia?”

“No. Well, excepting one.  I can clearly see the face of a monkey, some sort of howler creature from the jungles of South America.  It is laughing at me, as if I am an object of great ridicule.”

“You have been laughed at by a monkey?” Homer said, surprisingly.

“But it is not just a monkey.  It is wearing a tricorn hat.”

“Tricorn?” Lizzie gasped.  From the wide grin appearing on her lips, Homer could tell she was taking the bait.  This was a mystery that she could relish.

“Like in the war of independence,” Mr. Lot explained.  “And he has on a printed silk jacket and is holding a lace handkerchief.”

“Not like any monkey I’ve seen,” Homer quipped.  “Perhaps he is conflating two exhibits he saw at the menagerie.”

“No,” Lizzie said.  “I sense that there is an even more meaningful explanation.  But enough of that, we are poised at the beginning of a strange journey.  We have a man who clearly is married, lives in comfortable middle class conditions, doted on by his wife, harassed by his housemaid, and sports a rather expensive cherry and ivory walking stick.  He can afford the finest of clothing, clear enough from his habit of buying a new pair of boots when the old ones get dirty, and yet wears his jackets until they fray.  There are odd contradictions here.”

Mr. Lot looked at his stick as if seeing it for the first time, and then pulled at the threads wafting from his jacket.  “Oh,” he said.  “So I do! Perhaps I should go buy a new jacket.”  He gingerly patted his pockets.  “I don’t suppose anyone here can lend me some money.  I fear I have come sans sous.”

“And with a knowledge of French customs,” Lizzie added.

“You know so much about me,” Mr. Lot said hopefully.  “Can you tell my identity?”

“Nothing other than you are a member of a Masonic lodge or so the ring on your left hand informs me, and at some point this morning, after putting on your jacket but before buying your congress boots, you took a small dog, perhaps a Pomeranian, for a walk.”

The man checked the ring and the hairs on his overcoat with great interest then turned his attention back to Lizzie as if he were profoundly engaged by a doctor’s diagnosis.

“Perhaps it was on this sojourn that you had your morning shave on Columbia Street by a left handed barber, I would say Samuel Borden who is just this afternoon taking off on a vacation to the wilds of Maine, hence the haste with which he missed some patches of growth on your right chin.”             Mr. Lot turned to Homer and grinned.  “She’s very good!  What did you say her name was?”

Before Homer could reply, Lizzie resumed.  “Now if we confine our search to this city, we can use various techniques of a mental nature to distill from these clues, as Homer distills gold dust from pyrites, where you would live, who you would have as associates, and make the rounds to ascertain an identification. Your Masonic lodge is a good place to start, or Sammy Borden himself who you may have employed on a regular basis at a time when you knew your real identity.  I don’t see this case as particularly complicated, nor do I expect it to take very long, and since it is Homer who has brought you to me and he is a dear friend of mine, I will even perform this investigation gratis, expecting nothing in return but a good evening’s banter over a delightful home cooked meal, good company and a mug of medicinal syrup water.  Eh, Homer?  Doesn’t that sound grand?”

“Not complicated?” Homer asked.  “Lizzie, I don’t think you understand what’s going on here.”

“Don’t I?” Lizzie’s smile had turned sour.

“I met this man outside the police station.  He was part of a crowd that was gathering to get news of the murder.”

“Murder?” Lizzie recoiled.

“Yes, the murder of Sam Borden.  He was found dead in his barber shop not two hours ago.  His throat was slashed with his own razor.”

The room fell into a painful silence as Lizzie lost her sense of direction.  She was swooning, watching the walls turn about the ceiling.  Homer raced to her side and held her in position as she slowly regained her senses.

When she had found her balance, she stared at the man seated on the couch opposite her, assessing him with a fresh set of eyes.  Now his ordinary face seemed sharpened to the point of treachery. His gaze, once blank and neutral, now seemed coarse and cruel.  Perhaps the sinister shadow in his memory was himself, and he was on the verge of confronting his own guilt, his own sins.  Lizzie’s instinct was to call out to her father, charging it to him that he would confront this beast and save her from this unpleasant feeling of danger.

“Mr. Lot,” Lizzie said shakily.  “Do you have any idea what happened to the barber Mr. Borden?”

“Who?” Mr. Lot responded.  “I’m sorry but have we met before?”

“We have been in discourse for about ten minutes,” Lizzie assured him.

“Have we?” the man said alarmingly.  He turned to Homer and gasped at his face.  “Oh dear,” he said.  “It’s happened again.”

“What has happened again?” Homer asked desperately.

The man thought for a moment, blinked and then said with all sincerity, “I don’t know.”

Lizzie’s palpated breaths had reached a zenith, but she summoned enough energy to blurt out the only words that she could articulate:

“Father! Call Dr. Bowen!”

copyright 2016 by Richard Behrens

copyright 2016 by Nine Muses Books

 

Author Richard Behrens

It is with profound sadness that we at Nine Muses Books announce the passing of Richard Behrens, author of The Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective Mystery series and the writer, director and host of The Lizzie Borden Podcast. He was 52.
Richard was an extraordinary man, possessor of a gentle spirit and an amazing intellectual capacity that could painstakingly decode Finnegan’s Wake one moment, and laugh heartily at a silent Laurel and Hardy film the next. He was a voracious reader and easily read more than 10 books simultaneously, and collected an enormous library. He enjoyed the creative process of writing his comic mysteries of his Lizzie Borden Girl Detective series. Roars of laughter could be heard from his office as he wrote a particularly funny scene.
Richard leaves a vast legacy of unpublished works so his widow created a GoFundMe campaign to raise the funds needed to ensure the publishing of these unpublished stories, including his nearly completed Audible Amnesiac. If you wish to contribute, follow this link: https://www.gofundme.com/richard-behrens-publishing-fund
The Lizzie Borden Podcast was written, directed and hosted by Richard, and therefore will end with the 11th (and final) episode of Richard’s radio play The Agitated Elocutionist. Richard’s books will remain available on Amazon.com.
Please check back for future announcements about the upcoming publication of The Audible Amnesiac.

NEW! The Agitated Elocutionist Radio Play on Episode 11 of the Lizzie Borden Podcast

Nine Muses Books is proud to present:

Episode 11: The Agitated Elocutionist: A Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective Radio Play.

In this episode we bring you something completely different: an old-fashioned radio play adapted from The Agitated Elocutionist, one of Richard Behrens’ Lizzie Borden Girl Detective Mysteries. Although set in an authentic 1870s Fall River, MA, with a teenage Lizzie Borden and her real family members,  the rest is pure quirky fiction wrapped around an intriguing mystery.

In the world of the girl detective, and many years before her infamous arrest and trial for the murders of her father and stepmother, Lizzie Borden pursued a career as a private consulting detective, and as you are about to hear, in The Agitated Elocutionist, she matches wits with a pompous elocutionist and her devoted man-servant. You have met Lizzie Borden before, but never like this!

This radio play is a departure from our usual history-based podcasts, and it is just plain FUN! The quirky characters of Richard Behrens’ imagination come to life right from the pages of his delightful and intriguing mysteries. The actors are superb and hilarious, and the sound effects beautifully capture the Victorian-era flavor of the story.

The e-book version of The Agitated Elocutionist is available as a free download at Amazon.com along with the rest of the Lizzie Borden Girl Detective Mysteries.

CAST

The talented cast of The Agitated Elocutionist as pictured left to right in group photo above:
Aaron Potter-Rychwa as Police Officers Beck, Bence and Oxnard
Wendy Almeida as Madame Arbuthnot
Christopher Pratt as Banters the Valet
Heather Herring as Sarah Borden and the narrator
Tara Sabino-Potter as Lizzie Borden
Ian Hefele as Arthur Tinge
Tyler Strickland as The City Marshal
Richard Behrens as Gerard Gumley and writer/director
Mason Amadeus,  audio engineer
Catherine Behrens as Abby Borden (pictured below in red sweater)

Listen to the Podcast here or subscribe to the series on iTunes.

The Agitated Elocutionist Radio Play is copyright 2017 Richard Behrens and Nine Muses Books.

The play was engineered by Mason Amadeus and original music was composed and performed  by TAM Productions. The Play was recorded at Manadnock Broadcasting Group, Keene, NH.

COMING SOON! NEW Short Story Collection: The Audible Amnesiac and other Lizzie Borden Girl Detective Mysteries!

COMING SOON! The Audible Amnesiac and other Lizzie Borden Girl Detective Mysteries. A NEW short story collection by author Richard Behrens and copyright 2017 Nine Muses Books. More clever mysteries, more quirky characters and more fun reads!

Read excerpt from NEW Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective Mystery The Audible Amnesiac

greenfather2Exclusive! Get a sneak peek of our NEW Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective Mystery, The Audible Amnesiac, to be published Feb. 2017 in a new short story collection by Nine Muses Books. The excerpt is available only in our FREE Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective Newsletter.  To get your exclusive preview, Sign up to get your free newsletter at http://eepurl.com/bCtr6b.

Happy Holidays from all of us at Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective!

Lizzie Borden Author and Podcaster Richard Behrens interviewed by UK’s The Guardian

Author Richard Behrens finds Lizzie Borden's photo (lower left) in the Sherlock Holmes Museum ona recent trip to London's Baker Street

Author Richard Behrens finds Lizzie Borden’s photo (lower left) in the Sherlock Holmes Museum on a recent trip to London’s Baker Street

Lizzie Borden Girl Detective Mysteries author and Lizzie Borden Podcaster Richard Behrens finds Lizzie Borden’s photo (lower left) on the wall of Rogues in Sherlock Holmes’ bedroom at 221B Baker Street. Perhaps Mr. Holmes knew something we didn’t, as she was acquitted of the crimes of murdering her father and step mother!  Lizzie Borden herself visited London while on her European Grand Tour for her 30th birthday, just a few years before the infamous murders.

Recently Richard was interviewed about the lasting fascination with Lizzie Borden in the UK’s Guardian Newspaper. Read the story here.

NEW Lizzie Borden Podcast: Uncle John Morse with Joe Radza

23017445_119566315824Listen to the fourth episode of The Lizzie Borden Podcast, produced and directed by Richard Behrens for Nine Muses Books.   In this Episode Joe Radza discusses the dramatizations at the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast this August 4th and his role as John Vinnicum Morse.

John Vinnicum Morse (1833-1912) was the brother of Sarah Anthony Morse Borden, who was the wife of Andrew Jackson Borden, and he was the biological uncle to Lizzie Andrew Borden.  Sarah died when Lizzie was very young,  but “Uncle” John stayed in touch with the family even after Andrew remarried a few years later, marrying Abigail Durfee Borden who then became Lizzie Borden’s step-mother.

Morse was a guest in Andrew’s house on Second Street the morning the murders occurred, arriving the previous afternoon.  His alibi, however, was air-tight since he left early that morning to visit some relatives on Weybosset Street, who later corroborated his story.  He left Andrew and Abby Borden who had just finished breakfast and were preparing to perform their daily chores.  When Uncle John returned early that afternoon, both of his hosts were dead, brutally murdered with a hatchet.  For several days he remained confined to the house on Second Street.  When he ventured out to mail a letter, he was surrounded by a hostile crowd and had to be rescued by the police.  He testified at the Inquest, the Preliminary Hearing, and the Trial.  He was never seriously suspected to be the murderer but many researchers have doubted that he was entirely innocent.

Follow Lizzie Borden Girl Detective’s Pinterest boards!

 Not a member of Pinterest? Sign up, it is free and fun!  https://www.pinterest.com/lizziebordengd/

Lizzie after her acquittal.

Lizzie after her acquittal.

Follow our historical Lizzie Borden board, which contains images and information about the historical Lizzie Borden of Fall River who in 1892 was arrested for the murders of her father and step-mother, later to be acquitted. She is the inspiration for the fictional Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective by author Richard Behrens.

Visit our 20+ boards on Victorian oddities, Victorian lady detectives, Lizzie Borden videos, historic Fall River, Salem, Concord, MA as well as authors Louisa May Alcott, H.P. Lovecraft, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Other boards include Victorian spiritualism, and the murder cases of Helen Jewett and Sarah Cornell, as well as graves of the unusual and famous and even silent film comedy! New posts are made daily so be sure to follow lizziebordengd on Pinterest so you don’t miss a thing!

 

The Lizzie Borden Podcast – Episode One: The Doggerel

220px-Image-Lottie_Collins_sings_and_dances_to_the_tunes_of_Ta-Ra-Ra_Boom-de-ay_in_a_Bromo-Seltzer_adLizzie Borden took an ax and gave her mother forty whacks. When she saw what she had done, she gave her father forty-one. (sung to the tune of the nineteenth century song Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay.)

Folklore suggests that this jump rope rhyme that assumes Lizzie’s guilt was written anonymously by a reporter and used to sell newspapers during Lizzie’s trial. Whatever the true origin of the rhyme, it has remained part of our pop culture for more than a century despite its myriad of inaccuracies.

Hear more about this rhyme, or doggerel, on the premier episode of The Lizzie Borden Podcast produced by Nine Muses Books, now available on Youtube at https://youtu.be/15lU5bKeVKc

 

 

 

podcast avatarThe Lizzie Borden Podcast is written and produced by Richard Behrens and Nine Muses Books, Episode One: The Doggerel (recorded in 2011) provides an insight into the famous “jump rope” song about Lizzie Borden (“Lizzie Borden took an ax, etc.”), its history, its mystery and its legacy in our cultural imagination. Fall River historian and Lizzie Borden scholar Dr. Stefani Koorey and actress/playwright Jill Dalton join us to discuss this naughtily inaccurate ditty. More information on The Lizzie Borden Podcast can be found at http://www.lizziebordenpodcast.com and http://www.lizziebordengirldetective.com.

Guests:

Dr. Stefani Koorey
http://www.lizzieandrewborden.com

Jill Dalton
https://www.facebook.com/Jill-Dalton-…

Credits:

Richard Behrens: Writer, Producer, Host
http://www.lizziebordengirldetective.com

Mason Amadeus: Audio Engineer
http://MasonAndTucker.Bandcamp.com
http://Facebook.com/MasonAndTucker

Melora Creager: Music
http://meloracreager.space

Additional Music from Lizzie Borden Live by Larry Hockman

The Exhausted Amanuensis is FREE for the next three days on Amazon!

ExhaustedAmanuensisGet your FREE Copy of The Exhausted Amanuensis: A Lizzie Borden Girl Detective Mini-Mystery on Amazon for the next three days.

Introducing Miss Lizzie Borden of Fall River, Massachusetts, a most excellent girl detective and the most remarkable young woman ever to take on the criminal underworld. Many years before her infamous arrest and trial for the murders of her father and stepmother, Lizzie Borden pursued a career as a private consulting detective as chronicled in this clever and imaginative series of short stories. When exiled math professor J. Wellington Welles believes that he is moving backwards in time, Lizzie Borden goes undercover as his personal amanuensis to discover the exact moment of his future murder as well as the name of the killer! Joined by her sister Emma in the somewhat reluctant role of maid-of-all-work, the Girl Detective faces her most puzzling challenge yet, and races against time to solve the problem of the Dark Conclusion. You have met Lizzie Borden before, but never like this!

 

The Scrooge of Second Street, a new short story

Prince Albert's Christmas TreeNine Muses Press announces publication of its December 2015 issue of the Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective Newsletter, Volume 1, Number 2. The newsletters contains the latest news about Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective, and in addition,  a brand new short story, available exclusively in the newsletter! The newsletter is free, to receive your copy please sign up at http://eepurl.com/bCtr6b.  By signing up you will automatically receive the monthly newsletter as well as current announcements about Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective.

Book Reading and Signing in Keene, NH

toadstool-bookshopMeet Richard Behrens the author of  The Minuscule Monk  at a Book Signing and Reading at 2:00 PM on Saturday, October 24 in Keene, NH  at Toadstool Bookshop, Colony Mill Marketplace. This is event is free and open to the public.

The Minuscule Monk is a comic mystery that paints a portrait of Fall River, MA at the height of its Victorian splendor and Lizzie Borden, its most infamous citizen, at the start of her most excellent career as a consulting detective.

Come hear the author read from his comic mystery.  Also meet Herr Hugo von Trotter the Truth-Telling Dog and C.B.M. Borden the Existentialist Boy Detective.

For more info go to www.toadbooks.com

The Minuscule Monk is appropriate for both adults and young adults.

 

Book Signing in Fall River Saturday August 1st!

The Fall RIver Historical Society

Place: Fall River Historical Society, 451 Rock Street, Fall River, MA 02720

Date: Saturday, August 1, 2015

Time: 12:00-3:00 PM

Call for details: (508) 679-1071

The Minuscule Monk

The Minuscule Monk

 

 

Hear author Richard Behrens read from his latest Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective novel: The Minuscule Monk! Books will be available for purchase at the event and all proceeds benefit The Fall River Historical Society.

Meet Herr Hugo von Trotter, the truth-telling Boston Terrier, and hear how he helped Lizzie solve the Mystery of The Minuscule Monk!

Come hear excerpts from this comic mystery that paints a portrait of Fall River at the height of its splendor and its most infamous citizen at the start of her most excellent career.

 

The Minuscule Monk is now available on Amazon

The Minuscule Monk

The Minuscule Monk

Be the first to purchase, read and review The Minuscule Monk: A Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective Mystery.  The novel is now available on Amazon in a trade paperback edition.  The e-book edition will be available sometime next week.

Buy your copy now!

When a dead body mysteriously appears in the basement of her father’s furniture store, 15 year-old Lizzie Andrew Borden immediately takes on the case. Accompanied by an eccentric millionaire who campaigns to extend the vote to animals; a Boston terrier trained to sniff out crooked politicians; and a boy detective who believes the entire universe to be inside his own head, Lizzie follows a trail of taxidermy tools and Civil War bushwhackers to the Minuscule Monk, a legendary gunslinger whose mummified body will bring a punter’s pot to anyone who can deliver it to the New York gangster who has been hunting the Monk for decades. With such high stakes, everyone has a motive for murder, yet everyone seems innocent. Or perhaps, as Lizzie suspects after attending a dinner party with non-existent food and meeting a horse that has turned into its opposite, none of it is even real. Lizzie Borden, the Girl Detective of Fall River, is at her most spirited in The Minuscule Monk, a comic mystery that paints a portrait of Fall River at the height of its splendor and its most infamous citizen at the start of her most excellent career.

Author Richard Behrens interviewed by Fall River Herald

tv-the-lizzie-borden-chronicles02If you are a Lizzie Borden fan, you most likely know that The Fall River Chronicles has aired its fourth episode on the Lifetime Network.  Fall River Herald reporter Deborah Allard has been interviewing various Lizzie Borden historians, pundits and enthusiasts in a weekly Herald column.  Last night, she caught up with Lizzie Borden, Girl Detective author Richard Behrens about the episode entitled “Welcome To Maplacroft” and let him join in on the fun!

Read the interview here.

Richard has commented further: “Far be it from me to criticize the show for historical inaccuracies!  I guess serial killer is just as full of dramatic and comic potential as girl detective!”

Fall River Reading and Herald Article

The Fall River Historical Society is hosting a reading and book signing by author Richard Behrens on June 5, 2010 from noon to 2:30 p.m. The reading will be at 1 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.

The Fall River Historical Society is an important resource for anyone interested in Lizzie Borden, Fall River History, or Victorian American houses, since they are located in a granite mansion built in 1843 on Rock Street on the Hill in Fall River.  They also host a Lizzie Borden exhibit which includes the infamous handle-less hatchet that may have been murder weapon and other Lizzie related artifacts. The FRHS is also scheduled to publish Parallel Lives, a major non-fiction study of Lizzie Borden and Fall River, sometime in the next few months. This upcoming book is of particular interest to us because it promises to reveal new material about Lizzie Borden’s life, including the years covered by the Girl Detective stories. You can visit the Historical Society at www.lizzieborden.org for more information.

The Fall River Herald has just graciously published a wonderful article by Deb Allard about Lizzie Borden: Girl Detective on June 3. Thanks Deb!